First images after Prince Harry's book hit shelves show King Charles grinning broadly in ScotlandFirst images after Prince Harry's book hit shelves show King Charles grinning broadly in Scotland

First images after Prince Harry's book hit shelves show King Charles grinning broadly in Scotland

As he made his first public appearance following the publication of his son's memoir "Spare," His Majesty exuded a positive attitude.As he made his first public appearance following the publication of his son's memoir "Spare," His Majesty exuded a positive attitude.
As he made his first public appearance following the publication of his son's memoir "Spare," His Majesty exuded a positive attitude.
King Charles III appeared to be in a good mood as he traveled to Scotland on January 12. The 74-year-old monarch, who was pictured ...
...for the first time since his son Prince Harry published his autobiography Spare on Tuesday, had a big smile on his face.
The 38-year-old Duke of Sussex recalled how his father broke the heartbreaking news of Princess Diana's passing to him.
In addition, he claimed that his father told him a "remarkably unfunny joke" about not being his real father, making ...
...reference to the rumor that Harry was the result of a supposed liaison between Diana and Major James Hewitt.
He wrote in the book, "Never mind that my mother didn't meet Major Hewitt until long after I was born; they couldn't get enough ...
...of this 'joke,' for some reason perhaps it made them feel better about their lives that a young prince's life was laugh-able.
Despite the shocking accusations that Harry detailed about his father in Spare, King Charles appeared to be in a good mood while meeting with the Scottish citizens.
He was wearing a brown suit and a green plaid kilt, and as he spoke with people, he seemed to be grinning and laughing.
His Majesty interacted with locals who use the shed as a gathering place, including young families and seniors. The shed also serves as a venue for imparting practical skills training, according to what they wrote.
The King joined a group that was using the workshop to carve wood and stone, and he spoke with them about how the spaces ...
...had made them feel more a part of their community by introducing them to new people and teaching them new skills.
I really hope they're willing to sit down and talk about it, he said, adding that the door is always open and that the initiative now rests with them.
Before the book was published, a source close to the monarch told The Telegraph that he wanted to mend fences with his son.